Explanation of How the Super Rows Work

First we must consider how the Super Row Table is structured. The table was constructed so that each position in a horizontal row is a single half-step from its neighbor which means that all the notes which are separated by spaces are two half-steps apart. The other major characteristic of the table relates to the diagonals. Along the positive-slope direction, adjacent positions are perfect fourths (five half-steps) in the descending-slope direction and are perfect fifths (seven half-steps) in the ascending-slope direction. Along the negative-slope direction, adjacent positions are perfect fifths in the descending-slope direction and are perfect fourths in the ascending-slope direction.

Now consider the table shown below. The bottom row commences with the note C and is followed by the next seven notes of the diatonic scale which completes the octave with another C. The table finishes with an additional three notes of the diatonic scale. Again referring to the diatonic scale, the number of half step between B and C and also beween E and F is one. All other notes are separated by two half notes or one full note. The top row specifies the number of half steps between the note directly below and the preceeding note. Looking at the octave between the two C's we see the pattern on the top row of 2212221. This pattern of full tones and half tones is seen in all twelve of the diatonic scales.

2 2 1 22 2 1 22 1
C DE F G AB C D E F

Table : Pattern of steps and half step used in all diatonic scales.

Again considering C Major, CDE was read from the bottom row and FGAB from the top row. Looking at the above table, CDE matches the initial 22 and from the table, we know that EF is a single half step. To see how we traverse the Super Row Table to get to E we have to make use of the information about diagonals. CF (CDEF) is a Perfect Fourth and represents five half steps and from the Super Row Table, we observe that CF is a negative-slope ascending diagonal of five half steps. Thus, the fourth note of the octaval sequence is always a negative-slope ascending diagonal when the first three notes are on the bottom line. Now FGAB has a distance of six half notes and from the Super Row Table, we observe that FC is a negative-slope descending diagonal and thus is a Perfect Fifth with seven half steps giving us the extra half step from B to complete the C to C octave.

Again considering G Major, GAB was read from the top row and CDEG♭ from the bottom row. Looking at the above table, GAB matches the initial 22 and from the table, we know that BC is a single half step. To see how we traverse the Super Row Table to get to C we have to make use of the information about diagonals. GC (GABC) is a Perfect Fourth and represents five half steps and from the Super Row Table, we observe that GC is a positive-slope descending diagonal of five half steps. Thus, the fourth note of the octaval sequence is always a positive-slope descending diagonal when the first three notes are on the top line. Now CDEG♭ has a distance of six half notes and from the Super Row Table, we observe that CG is a positive-slope asscending diagonal and thus is a Perfect Fifth with seven half steps giving us the extra half step from G♭ to G to complete the G to G octave.